The Appropriate Practice Scope of Chiropractic May Be a Political Question, Not a Scientific One

This article is part of a series on Health Policy. See also:

  1. Ground Control to Major Reform
  2. Hospital Salaries Could Cut Care Costs
  3. The Appropriate Practice Scope of Chiropractic May Be a Political Question, Not a Scientific One
Chiropractic isn't the only legal business with questionable scientific underpinnings

Chiropractic isn’t the only legal business with questionable scientific underpinnings

A Colorful History

At the turn of the 20th century, medicine was at a turning point. Unscientific practices like bloodletting, bonesetting, and magnetic healing still pervaded medical practice. On the other hand, trust in the scientific method was mounting. Darwin’s controversial Origin of Species, published several decades earlier, was gaining acceptance. Louis Pasteur proved that life, including bacteria, can’t generate itself spontaneously, and Robert Koch developed a testable set of postulates for determining whether a particular bacteria was the cause of an illness. A future of medicine could be envisioned in which medical intervention was chosen from the pages of science alone, rather than from the pages of history.

D.D. Palmer was, then, what one might call a conservative. Continue reading

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Hospital Salaries Could Cut Care Costs

This article is part of a series on Health Policy. See also:

  1. Ground Control to Major Reform
  2. Hospital Salaries Could Cut Care Costs
  3. The Appropriate Practice Scope of Chiropractic May Be a Political Question, Not a Scientific One

When doctors are rewarded for throughput, the result is hasty care, and we all pay the price. Let’s reward our doctors for performance instead.

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CT scanner overuse can tell us a lot about what’s wrong with the healthcare industry.

TIME article Bitter Pill tells of a 64-year-old woman named Janice S., who, upon feeling chest pains, was rushed to the hospital for diagnosis. After a few tests, she was told that she had indigestion; her pains resulted from mere heartburn. But her local Stamford Hospital in Connecticut slapped her with $21,000 worth of bills.

Janice’s case is just one example of an all too common phenomenon: Americans paying far too much for simple procedures. The ACA makes headway by requiring insurance for everyone, but even after its passing, inefficiencies still abound. Let’s take a look at what’s really driving up costs in American healthcare.

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Ground Control to Major Reform

This article is part of a series on Health Policy. See also:

  1. Ground Control to Major Reform
  2. Hospital Salaries Could Cut Care Costs
  3. The Appropriate Practice Scope of Chiropractic May Be a Political Question, Not a Scientific One

The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) runs the nationwide waiting list for donor kidneys. 100,000 Americans currently sit on this list; unfortunately, 50% will die before a kidney arrives, as wait times can exceed 10 years.  Further, since the number of recipients is growing faster than the number of donors, the wait time, and consequently the mortality rate, can only be expected to increase. (1)

But there’s hope! Recent updates to the UNOS donor kidney allocation policy might drastically reduce wait times.

Larry Swilling took to the streets for fear that his wife was losing the race with the waiting list. He found a donor just a month ago.

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